On Getting and Receiving

I read a book.
I earned a degree.
I appreciated a song.
I watched a movie.
I shared an idea.

I got a burger at Wendy’s.
I got a parking ticket.
I got a migraine.

I got a massage.

Maybe it’s just a little thing, but how did massage come to be spoken of as a passive activity, something that just appears in our lives, occurs without our interference, and then vanishes again, like an itch or a coupon? I got a gallon of milk for half off. Nice, huh?

To receive is not to give up autonomy. It’s half of an interaction. When a phone line goes bad, we say, there’s no reception. We understand that that conversation has ended, and try again later, somewhere new.

Being an active recipient of massage doesn’t mean you have to chat. It can mean focus, meditation, deep breathing. It can mean speaking up when you’re uncomfortable, or asking for what you need. Being an active recipient of massage can mean making a conscious decision to give your body into someone else’s care, allowing yourself to daydream or even sleep. But it means owning those choices, knowing that they contribute to this process that you’re engaging in with somebody else, this process called massage. It’s not something that happens. It’s not something you can get.

to receive

I don’t know what kind of language we can use to communicate this understanding. To share, to experience, to explore, to feel, to enter into … none sounds quite right. Maybe receive is the best we have right now, with its undertones of to welcome, to take part.

But whatever language we choose, let’s try to find creative ways to acknowledge that our clients are not just consumers, but partners, and save get for the flu.

Kat Mayerovitch is a licensed massage therapist and recent Midwest transplant to Dallas, Texas. She also works as a copywriter, volunteers like mad in local community development, and plays the ukulele. If you like her writing here, Kat writes more good stuff at LMT or Bust.

photo credit: Pink Sherbet Photography via photopin cc

Turning Warm Leads Into Well-informed Clients

Looking for some suggestions on how to get, manage, and effectively turn warm leads into “a client on your table”?  I’ve got some practices, here, in lead gathering and use that apply to primarily a sole-proprietorship but can also apply to any business.

Even before I started professionally practicing massage therapy, I knew I had to get as many people on my table as possible, and the more diverse in body type, considerations, and client goals, the better – I was going to open my own private practice someday.

But, before I even got out into the massage therapy world after my basic training, I knew that I had to come out from under my shell..and actually talk to people to get them on my table.  Student Clinic prepared me for that one-on-one interaction and encouraged me to get my hands on as many people as possible AND gave me a tool to keep track of everyone I had on my table [during Clinic]…and off the table [that I had talked with about massage therapy].

head-scratcher

In the beginning, and with people that I talked to (trying to get them on my table) understanding that I was “new”, I had a hard time getting contact information, much less talking about what I would do with it once I got it from that person.

I thought a good method would be to direct “people on the street” to my website, where they could sign up for an occasional newsletter that I would publish and learn more about me – that way I could get their email address.

Then I thought, a good way to get “people at gigs where I was doing chair massage” to get on my table was to include a space for the chair client’s email address and permission to contact them on the release form.

Then I thought, why don’t I get “people at a wellness event/fair” to sign up for my contacting them via email.

These, unfortunately for me I learned, were really permanent warm leads that I was creating.  However, the web-disseminated information about massage therapy I did create to serve these warm leads allowed others who would search for a massage session and become my client find me (based on relevant search results, in “massage”) through my various (and consistent) business listings and profiles, and book with me based on my web presence or presentation.

Following are some practices I use to effectively and for-the-long-term interact with potential clients and some techniques I use to create, through my database information, working relationships as “people who get on my table”:

Contact [Enrollment] – anyone is a potential client.  Be aware that personal relationships can also be professional relationships and that your sister will eventually hold two or more roles in your professional practice: sister, client, referrer – be sure you put her in the appropriate-named database categories, too.  Treat every Contact as your client, and treat their contact information, permission, and intent like gold – because it really is fortunate that they want what you have to give.

admtCreating a List – collect contact/business cards.  If they don’t have one, ask for their name/phone #/email address [to write down] so you can keep in contact with them about that awesome, enthusiastic conversation you just had with them about massage therapy.  Any other information you think is important to know/note: also include that in the information you collect.

Storing your List – when you get their phone number through their business card or verbal information, keep it in your phone or, better, an online service that is seen through and interacts with your phone/website.  Often times when someone calls you, Caller ID may fail – if their name & phone number are already in your phone, you’ll know who it is right away and be able to minimize or avoid altogether that awkward feeling of that “I recognize your voice, but…who are you, again?” moment.  Also: computer spreadsheets, paper spreadsheets, paper address books, contact databases in a local email client (Outlook, Eudora, etc) or online (Gmail, Yahoo, etc) are efficient ways to keep the information permanent – in electronic version, you’ll definitely want to BACK UP your information or print it out on paper every once in a while to assure you never lose it.

Using your List – regarding contact information: if you have the ability to categorize your contacts easily, do.  I separate non-clients and clients in my database with color coded categories in Outlook for easy access later, for things like creating client letters, broadcast announcements, and the like.  Regarding email addresses you got in an online form: I use Google’s Feedburner to automatically send out my blog website’s RSS feed entries to my Feedburner-subscribed email list.  This is so I know that everyone interested in the information but who are not necessarily my client get the feed they subscribed to on my website.  With Feedburner, I can manually enter email addresses that I have collected and have “permission to market” on file.

Once you have your contact list started, populated with people who are “warm” leads (aka, of whom you have not yet had the pleasure of meeting) and of whom you have permission to market, start the scheduled emails.  Stay ahead of the game by always having more than enough articles to publish.  If you have specials to promote, make sure that you include that information (maybe even a link to a permanent webpage featuring the details of the special) somewhere in the email.

Maintaining your List – the best rule of thumb that I have used is: take care of it now.  Any delay in adding or removing a contact from your list only reflects on you as apathetic and uninterested in the needs/desires of your audience.  Most email systems, like Feedburner, Constant Contact, Email Brain, will have automated unsubscribe links within each email sent – easy for the recipient to Unsubscribe if they want.  But make sure manual entries and deletions to these permission-based list are done promptly – your efforts will be appreciated, leaving you looking professional…and possibly worth electronically- or professionally-reconnecting with at some point.  I like the automated emails that state “did you mean to unsubscribe?” or “if you would like to re-subscribe at any time, please click this link” in the unsubscribe confirmation emails – I keep these for future (resubscription) intentions.

The following suggestions are based more on ethical considerations moreso than business practice or practice-building:

DOs – establish permission-based marketing

checkedCollect business cards – it has always been my understanding that if someone gives me a business card, it is implied consent to contact them.  That said, I only contact them with their business card information about the “thing that we talked about” when they gave me their card.

checkedUse “sign up/in” sheets at events – include a space for [your client’s or potential client’s] email address AND indicate, somewhere on the form, that you’ll contact them [in the future] with…well, you decide: newsletter, specials, surveys, etc.

checkedCreate a form on your website that collects a visitor’s email address – when they are asked to sign up, they are usually promised something: a regular newsletter, specials notifications, first-time client offers, and the like.  You can make it worth their while – to be in your database – if you personally email them an article you wrote, a “tips”/information sheet, or even an infographic you have permission to use or made yourself to connect their website entry with you personally.

DON’Ts – spam

uncheckedCollect email addresses anonymously or “harvest” them from sites that explicitly state that using the information on the site in ways other than the purpose of the site (which is to connect massage therapist(s) to clients, for massage therapy purposes, et al).  This type of information gathering is not permission-based and will get you blacklisted on the major email services (AOL, gmail, Hotmail, etc) or account terminated on web-based email list management services (Email Brain, Constant Contact, , etc) if you are reported as “spam” – to the ISP, mail service, or list management services through their no-spam “unsubscribe” policies.

uncheckedPut people on lists that they did not sign up for.  The fastest way to lose an electronic client…and possibly a live one…when they figure out you added them because they were in your database and not subscribed or interested in the information you started sending them.

uncheckedSend too many communications by email/RSS feed – when you do more than monthly newsletters that have advertisement or promotion in them, “overbearing” comes to mind of the reader…and every time they see your email header in their Inbox.  This results in a behavior modification that not only hurts your business but also your identity/reputation.  If you send an article ONLY of interest to your email database – and make it relevant to the service and/or product you purvey in another space (like a booking webpage), link it in the footer or signature of every email you send out.  I promise: people will always know where to find you when you are consistent in placing your contact information there.

 

Now, if you’ve read this far AND are not familiar with all these concepts, your head might be swimming – please ask questions, give suggestions, confirm/deny, or feel free to leave your favorite smoothie recipe below.  Maybe you’ll be able to put down the Dramamine before you’re done typing 😛

What are some ways you collect contact information, methods you use to connect with warm leads, or “best practices” for maintaining a relevant database for your practice or business?

Tips and Accepting Them

There are many ways for a gift to be given: under a tree, at a party, in the driveway…but there is always some level of trepidation for receiving gifts, especially for me in my professional life.

I am a Licensed Massage Therapist.  There are several images that come to mind and situations where massage therapists are part of a personal health or mental regimen for a client/patient that make the MT a facilitator or procurer of better health.  There are also positions in which massage therapists are considered, for all technical purposes, healthcare providers, like in a rehabilitative or preventative sense.

Although I do not advertise that I either accept or don’t accept gratuities offered following a massage therapy session that I facilitate for my paying or non-paying client/patient, I am often confronted with what is to me, from a business standpoint, an awkward situation: receiving a tip.  To receive or not to receive?

If I accept, will it become a regular thing for this client to tip?  Well, I think I first have to ask – is this something that this client normally does (or doesn’t do, in the case this situation never happens with this client)?  I never assume that it is a habit, and much less a habit that I will strive to hope or see happen in the future – if I do, then I will be “working for tips,” which is not in my work ethic.  I charge a fair price for services rendered and only expect payment for the service as agreed upon with my client/patient.  So, what’s next?

Is this tip the result of a Pavlovian behavior pattern?  In other words: is the client/patient used to tipping massage therapists or any service professional?  Is this a behavior I want to encourage by setting a precedent of accepting the tip?

After I have decided on the nature of the tip and whether or not I should accept it without question or challenge, it may seem like the end of the story.  But let’s dive a little deeper…

Are massage therapists considered service professionals or healthcare professionals?  They are each to each clients’ needs.  If a massage therapist serves a “relaxation” purpose, or the clients’ expectations are for “relaxation” – usually resolve for a mentally-stressful situation – then I see a massage therapist as a service professional.  If the purpose is to rehabilitate, prevent, or maintain good health (like in a program), then I see a massage therapist as a healthcare professional.

Next question: is it appropriate to tip service professionals?  Yes, societal practice and situational results encourage a sense of gratitude that is often expressed in an economic transaction – the tip: that “extra” money/gift that is given to the provider for a job done “above and beyond” the regular price paid.

Is it appropriate to tip healthcare professionals? Not always – In my experience, other-than-massage-therapist healthcare professionals focus on the altruistic nature of their work and may not consider their service to be qualified to establish an “above and beyond” ability that “service-oriented” professions often make a goal and, thus, do not expect the same behavior from their patients.  I might even go out on a limb and say that Tipping may be perceived as a capitalistic behavior and that healthcare (from an individual healthcare professional’s viewpoint) is not as capitalistic in nature.

This classification massage therapists playing the role of service or healthcare provider is a complicated one, but to me, and for the purposes of this article, let’s agree that the classifications have made a distinction in the nature of the compensation given by the client/patient.  There are certainly different roles, like each of these, that indeed a single massage therapist can fulfill.

Tipping sends a message: I appreciate you, professionally: more than you’re charging me.  When these messages are not clear is when the tipping conversation/questions comes up: I don’t know if I should tip you or not, so I will to be safe (socially-speaking); I expect a tip because I “always” give extraordinary service (from the service provider’s viewpoint); or, I do not tip my doctor so why should I tip you (or expect a tip, from a healthcare provider’s viewpoint)?

My policy, no matter if I’m playing the role of service or healthcare provider, has always been “Tips are never expected, but always appreciated.”

Do you want to refuse a tip more than once? – you can be a staunch supporter of the work ethic that says: it’s too weird to accept more pay that I have already agreed to.  There are boundary issues that may be important to you to avoid with the implication that a client/patient may gain some “advantage” in the client-patient/therapist relationship.  I suspect that that is the main reason for healthcare providers’ “no tipping” policies, and definitely respect it.

Do you want to have a “no tipping” policy?  – do you make it clear, prior to the session, that “tips are not accepted”?  This may precipitate a rogue tipper or two (to actually tip, despite policy), but that would be the most-professional (and likely –effective) way to create the expectation of your client/patient.

In my practice, I do not speak of tipping – when asked, I state my policy “never expected, always appreciated”…so why do I “not talk about tipping”?  I believe it is a personal choice, and not one that I have or want control over.  When I am offered, I accept based on the role I am playing: service or healthcare provider, and often after I have refused.

Here are a couple of examples of my First Refusal:

  • “Thank you so much for the thought: I really appreciate it, but why don’t you use it for your next massage [or a massage package] – when do you want your next massage?”
  • “Thank you so much – tips are not necessary.  I appreciate your commitment to massage therapy – may we apply that to your next massage?”

Here a couple ways I practice humility when receiving a tip after refusing it once:

  • “Thank you so much for your tip – I will be donating this to [name of cause]__________ as part of my contribution to community/non-profit activities that I believe in.”
  • “Thank you so much for your tip – I will be investing in furthering my expertise in massage therapy for you and all of my clients/patients in ____________________ class I’m registering for [soon].”

I think to refuse a tip offered more than once would be insulting to the client/patient and would also be a form of self-sabotage: to not consider that I am good enough to be paid “more than” what I am charging.  Obviously, that client/patient thinks I should be charging more than I am for my service/healthcare.

If you don’t like accepting tips, why not consider increasing your pricing?  That may be the message you are hearing but not heeding.

If you like accepting tips, the excellent service you provide daily may go unnoticed by some (and already-expected by some) and greatly-noticed and appreciated by others – “Up” your game by trying new customer service techniques that not only set you apart from other practices, but also put you in a class of your own.

Where do you stand on tipping/gratuities?  “To Tip”, or “Not To Tip”?

Get A Loyal Client – Tell Me About Yourself

a word on Selling:

Any good salesperson will tell you: “it’s not about what you say…it’s HOW you say it.”  That is truly the point of this assault on what most of us believe is our truer sense to heal the world, one body at a time, as massage practitioners.

There is a time in the practice of our profession when a transaction becomes part of what we do when we get someone on our massage table.  Whether it is for a monetary transaction, an emotional transaction, or a karmic sale that we complete, the sale of a massage therapy session takes place.

I recently had the pleasure of re-joining my alma mater’s faculty and am again doing what I love: teaching.  Specifically, teaching professional development curricula to budding massage therapist students, and I see the value in what I do as assisting clients that I will never see, never meet, and never touch.

One of the most important things that a massage therapy professional can achieve is not to “be professional”, be a good business person, or even be a “good” massage therapist.  I believe it is to accurately and compassionately convey the value of massage therapy based on their own beliefs.  When a practitioner can do that successfully, the sale of a massage therapy session is a matter of fact.

Educate the Client…

The word ‘education’ is a pretty soft word.  There is an understanding that information may or may not be transferred efficiently, effectively, or at all…or be accepted likewise.  There is a responsibility in the delivery, content, and testing of the educator…just as with sales: the introduction, listing the benefits/values of the product/service, and the close/delivery/follow-up.

When I refer to what a professional does, it is not so much as “represents” or “professes” the nature or benefits of massage, but more succinctly: what the massage therapist believes.  Of course, what a practitioner believes is not always what they are told are the benefits of massage…or should be.  Testing, trying, and being aware of benefits outside of the massage therapy session can become the crux of how massage therapy clients are educated.

When educating our clients, again, it is not just about the physical, emotional, or spiritual benefits of manipulation of their tissues – it can include (which is often overlooked) the VALUE of massage therapy.  But how do practitioners create value in massage therapy?

When it comes to running a massage business or practicing massage, it is a common misnomer and not-as-effective-choice to FIRST put a monetary value on the transaction.  “Am I charging too much? How can I get more clients…with a “special”?  Should I have a sliding scale?  Can I pass out business cards at this volunteer massage event?” are just a few of the questions that may come up where monetary value is concerned.  All valid questions, but at what point is the education of the client based on getting them on the table?

Is the transaction put at risk (in the long term) if the basis of the education is established FIRST in the monetary value of the massage session?  My answer is:  Yes.  The interest of a client who does not innately see an intrinsic value in the massage therapy session – based on the massage professional’s affinity for massage – will likely peter off into disinterest.

How do we get and keep the interest and the investment of the client in our practice?  How do we drive the client to see the value in massage therapy, beyond the physical, emotional, and spiritual benefits?  I believe it is to educate them about our own beliefs and hopes for and to illustrate the functional unit of therapeutic massage:

  1. Stay up on the latest massage therapy information in your community (scientific and anecdotal),
  2. Keep informed about the most recent, global massage therapy theories, research, and practices,
  3. Immerse ourselves in our passion, our focus, and our profession – through our own continuing education, associations, and speaking our Vision for our practices, amongst ourselves and anyone who will listen – without promise of remuneration.

Educate our clients about all of these things, on a regular basis, about how WE see massage and value it – SHOW our motivation, CREATE some excitement.  People are attracted to passion, enthusiasm, and general happiness.  It is what they desire…to replace any degree of pain, disappointment, and lack of touch therapy somewhere in their own lives or histories.

…Sell the Service

If you have it to give, give it.  If you have it to sell to them in a recognized, trustworthy format – like on a menu of services – for goodness sake: do not undermine your client-education efforts by relegating the “sales” of massage to some disdainful, disgusting act that only applies to people who purvey automobiles.  Sell with pride – realize that they will accept either the blue pill or the red pill, and it is the “pill” that is the vehicle by which they will receive the value of your service.

I am soooooo excited to see student practitioners’ whose light bulbs go on: when they realize that what they are selling is not massage, but themselves.  I, too, need to revisit this thought process from time to time, and also realize:  we enliven each other’s practices by finding new ways to create value for massage therapy.  I find value in their enthusiasm and their stories of “why massage is important to me.”  When they can educate their client about “why massage is important to me,” then the light bulb of getting a client on the table AND “making a sale” turns on…and they gain a loyal client and a customer!