Massage Gadget Boneyard

We all have them: The vestiges of ideas we’ve had, equipment we’ve invested in, or the things we should be using right now but — oh wait! There’s something shiny and new and what was I doing again?

Yeah, that. 

I should be writing this from my iJoy massaging recliner upstairs, but instead I’m in my living room, lounging in a non-electrified chair, watching some nice ladies peddle leather handbags on HSN. I managed to extract myself from the velour-covered cushions long enough to dig through my closet, locating 78% of the massage stuff currently gathering dust in my abode. 

The Sharper Image neck massager, foot massagers, and Conair vibrating massage wand thingy

The Sharper Image neck massager, foot massager, and Conair vibrating massage wand thingy


Here we’ve got some wooden trigger point tools, a wooden foot massager that my sister gave me for Christmas years ago, and a Panasonic rolling massager wand, all nestled in this bubbling foot spa!

But wait! There’s more!


facial steamer

And finally, the piece de resistance from my archaeological excavation…

A partially-disassembled electric massage table!

A partially-disassembled electric massage table!

What the hell am I doing over here? And why did I just order a personal TENS unit from Amazon last night?

Tell me I’m not alone in this. Which massage goodies have you been collecting over the years? And (if you’re at liberty to share) how do they fit into your plan for world domination? 

Things that are funny and things that are not

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about professionalism and ethics. Specifically, the differences between them, and the applications of those definitions on our actions and words as massage therapists.

I’ve labored over various definitions. I’ve looked at situations where I’ve used the words interchangeably and probably incorrectly. I’ve though about where I’ve used each word properly. And I’ve come to a conclusion.

ID-10065252I kinda don’t care about getting the exact verbiage right.

I care about the meaning, the intent, and the context of any particular interaction. What follows is the story of how I started thinking about this.

I saw a funny graphic on Facebook. It was pretty funny. It said, ” Crazy Client Request “I want extra work on my neck, but don’t mess up my hair.”” Lots of people commented on how funny it was. A few hundred people have shared it. Because it’s funny. And true. We know it happens all the time.

But it bothers me. It bothers me that a few hundred massage therapists think it’s okay to publicly joke about client requests. (Side note: I expressed this in the comments under the image and got nailed. Rightly so. I know better than to start a fight on someone else’s turf. I should’ve just sent a message to the page owner. I’ve apologized for that. I was an asshat.)

Plenty of people disagree with me and think I’m being a tightass. They are correct. I am a tightass. My question is: Why aren’t they?

If a client walked into your office and said, “I’ve got an awful headache, but please don’t get oil in my hair, I’ve got to go back to work after this,” would you actually say, “That’s a crazy request, hahahah!” Would you holler out to a colleague, “Hey, Jane, check it out, this client wants me to work on her head but not get oil in her hair. HA!” Probably not.

Shouldn’t we all be extra sensitive about accidentally, or intentionally, saying something that may make a client afraid to speak up, or afraid to come to us?

Let’s apply this to real life

Let’s say a very shy person, a potential client, is following your Facebook page. They enjoy your posts about stretching, the links to local community events, and the occasional picture of your silly office antics. They’re warming up to the idea of getting massage as they get to know you through your marketing.

Then, they see a joke titled Crazy Client Request. A joke made at the expense of a client. What’s the underlying message here? If you ask your massage therapist for something, they may make fun of you. Publicly. It’s pretty safe to assume that the shy person will never step foot in your office.

Is this an extreme line of thinking? Yes. As it should be. When we’re talking about the feelings of clients, about accidentally intimidating someone, alienating an otherwise ideal potential client, or about hurting a current client’s feelings, we should absolutely think in extremes.

In the most extreme of circumstances, this man committed suicide. He refused to seek help because throughout his childhood he heard his parents and other medical practitioners breech confidentiality and make sport of their mentally ill patients.

Jokes about hair are not extreme. They are silly and funny. But it’s a slippery slope, and a very easy connection for an already shy person to make.

Ummmm, Allissa? Aren’t you a preacher of Marketing with Personality?

Yup. I’m a big fan of letting your personality shine through in your business.

But let’s be clear, there’s a big difference between being silly enough to display a Darth Vader cookie jar in your office, and actively making fun of a client.

Marketing with personality isn’t about casually treating your clients like crap. It’s about being human, warm, and fun in your business. And if you’re too busy to download the ebook, no worries, here’s the important stuff:

You want to be yourself. But you want to be a professional version of yourself. This is a huge topic, we could spend endless chapters on boundaries. Here are some potential land mines to be aware of, and avoid.


Be yourself, unless…

You’re a jerk. If you’re surly and grumpy and super-sarcastic, rein it in. I’m not suggesting that you flip into Happy Cheerleader mode whenever a client walks in the door. Just consider the way your edges could be smoothed to improve the client’s experience.

You’re a flirt. If you’re a highly sexualized person, very flirty and touchy, rein it in. When you are anywhere that could be a marketing/networking possibility, stop it. Don’t do a giggle and a hair flip, don’t talk about sex. Don’t. Just don’t.

Take some time to explore what your weakness are. Recognize them, and have a plan in place to diffuse these land mines before they explode.


Be yourself, unless…

You’ve got a guilt complex. If you’re someone who likes to give and give, and you tend to overcommit and overwork yourself trying to help others in all aspects of your life, rein it in. It’s simply not an effective way to run a business, it’s not a healthy way to work.

You’re a pushover with your schedule. Stop it. Find the easy ways to say no. Practice saying “I’m sorry, I’m booked up.” Get cozy referring out to MT’s who work on your days off.

It’s important to acknowledge that there should be real thought involved in this process. These guidelines are not One Size Fits All. We’re not talking about ignoring ethical concerns and getting casual at your place of business. This is a process, and like any other aspect of business, you need to use good judgement and common sense.

So for me, I think of it this way: I may have clients leave because they don’t like my hands-on techniques. I may have potential clients who never come in because they see an occasional atheist sentiment in my twitter stream. I’m okay with that. But if I ever lose a client or potential client because they felt I was insensitive to their needs, or they feared I would make fun of them, I will consider that a huge professional failure. Huge.

For you: Well, you’ve got to figure that out for yourself. Consider your feelings. Consider the feelings of the people who will see what you ‘like’ and post on Facebook, and interact accordingly.

Image courtesy of David Castillo Dominici /

The Comeback

Whether it’s due to stress or burnout, most of us find ourselves stuck in the occasional rut. At times it can feel like we’re trudging through quicksand, like we can’t take a deep breath, or like we’re just plain tired and uninspired. 

I spent the first half of 2015 feeling this way, preceded by most of 2014. My husband’s brother had passed away unexpectedly, my Yahoo Small Business web host had been messing with my Confident Massage CE site for several months and I had to recreate the whole thing from scratch, my husband was going through a major career shift, and I was still getting my little day spa (with recently added nail services and nail service licenses) off the ground. Sure, I was functional. But for 18-plus months I was also feeling buried in stress, grief, and pent up frustration. Life was just kind of going on without me. It got to the point where doing something as simple as loading the dishwasher or folding the laundry took all the motivation I could muster, and seeing a basic task through to completion was cause for a ticker tape parade. 

Something broke late this summer. My beloved massage therapist and I camped at Cathedral Gorge where she gave me a massage in a tent and we slept under the stars. My beloved hairstylist and I drove to Jerome and Sedona, finding inspiration in countless shops and boutiques. I drove to the Bay Area and stayed with my beloved ladyfriends who had just opened a cafe in Vallejo. I took photos at numerous cemeteries (a hobby of mine) and even sought out four filming locations from the movie Harold and Maude (my favorite!). 

While in Sedona I bought a wind chime in the shape of a black cat. I wanted to bring something home to remind me of the freedom and inspiration that comes from stepping outside of one’s bubble. This purchase motivated me to clean up my tiny backyard so my kitty would have a nice place to live. 

Power tools would've been a wise investment.

Power tools would’ve been a wise investment.

My backyard is tiny. The trees and shrubs had been growing wild for three years and it was a mess. But a snip here, a trim there, some Amazon bargain shopping and four trash cans of yard waste later…and voila! My tiny gothic meditation garden had become a reality. It’s not much, but for me this was a big accomplishment. 

Skeleton and kitty.

Skeleton and kitty.

And so began the comeback. I’m blogging again, both here and here. I’m working on a new CE course. I just found a new spa product line to retail. I added some new services to my menu. I registered for an intense, intriguing CE course on end of life issues. I even printed out a ream’s worth of MSDS sheets for the office (and promptly replaced my black ink cartridge). 

Chances are I’ll encounter the funk again at some point, but man, it sure does feel good to embrace the comeback.

Massaging A Wardrobe

Constructed of black sweatshirt fleece, it was as if a robe and a hoodie had made a baby. 

The shame factor hadn’t quite achieved “Snuggy”, but was definitely higher on the spectrum than “Old Navy Peacoat”. 

$39.99 plus tax later, it was all mine. 

High fashion in the H&M fitting room.

High fashion in the H&M fitting room.

This hot little number will keep me cozy as I walk from the parking garage to my office and back this autumn. It goes with most everything else I wear, and if I accidentally get some foot balm on it, a little Tide and a trip through the “normal” cycle will take care of my mess. 

My hoodie-robe shopping trip got me thinking: How do we decide which uniforms will work best for us? How many of us still don massage school khakis and polo shirts years after we graduate? How many of us opt for scrubs? And how do we determine if we should wear solid purple or kitty cat print?

No kitty cats here.

No kitty cats here.

One huge perk of running my own business is that I can get away with wearing whatever I want. (Well, within reason. The cosmetology board has a *few* rules.) From the day I opened my office I’ve consistently worn black (or a rare gray item) as my uniform. It’s easy on the eyes, easy to shop for, and if you wear the same type of thing every day you’ll help to build your brand just by wearing clothes.

Long skirts from Target were my jam this summer. Too long skirts from Target were jamming up my stool casters this spring before I wised up.

Long skirts from Target were my jam this summer. Too long skirts from Target were jamming up my stool casters this spring before I wised up.

A while back I wore custom made black tees with my logo screen printed on them. I loved them so much I wore them out. Price-wise they ran a smidge over $10 each. I should order more when I’m not so busy blogging about textiles and discount department stores.

Here's me during my video podcast heyday. Note the shirt.

Here’s me during my video podcast heyday. Note the shirt.

I’m super curious: What do you take into consideration when you’re choosing a uniform? What’s a priority feature in a uniform? Is the fact that I’m using the word “uniform” making you throw up in your mouth a little bit? If so, why?

Not my proudest moment on many levels. Silky pants from Target, Bettie Page thrift store shirt purchased for 99 cents, office restroom toilet.

Not my proudest moment on many levels. Silky pants from Target, Bettie Page thrift store shirt purchased for 99 cents, office restroom toilet.

Come on up to the runway and sashay, shantay! :)

Think Before You Speak

I remember being chastised as a kid for asking my aunt if she was “racist” during a family dinner party. We were at the kitchen table at my parents’ house, and she said something about Ted Danson and Whoopi Goldberg dating. If memory serves, it was along the lines of “why can’t she find a black man so a white woman can date him?”. I can only assume the technical answer to this question had something to do with Ted Danson’s impressive chin anatomy, but my kid brain didn’t care about that. It only cared that it was taught not to judge people based on their appearances, and an adult’s comment in my parents’ house didn’t match up with that world view. A kid, a comment, a question, a curse. Maybe that’s when I learned to fear my own thoughts.

I redeemed myself in future years, catching loved ones in the act and pointing out that saying “that’s so gay” (intended meaning: “that’s so bad/ugly/uncool”) sounds ignorant and ridiculous. These weren’t ignorant bigots saying this, and this was not a Danson/Goldberg/kitchen table moment. This was nonsensical verbiage projectile vomited into the Millennial Collective Consciousness, and we were better than this. 

Taking offense is a personal thing, although overheard mouth caca need not be personal in nature to be offensive. Sometimes the things we say or gestures we make almost daily have the potential to offend, turn off, cause unease or make us look less intelligent and professional than we really are.

As massage therapists it is our calling to comfort, but this can be challenging when we’re oblivious to what we’re communicating. Do any of the following examples sound familiar?

Retarded – Saying that someone or something is “retarded” is bound to offend sooner rather than later, even if you’re just talking about yourself. Think twice before uttering “this table warmer is being retarded”. Also worth noting in this category are words like “idiot”, “dumb”, and “lame”, as these words have historically referred to people with different mental and physical traits that deviate from the norm, and are now used in a negative context. 

Gyp – Let’s lump this one in with all racially-derived digs on a person’s character. It turns out the Roma people (“gypsies”) don’t appreciate being associated with cheating and scams. Saying “I don’t want to gyp you out of your time” can make your very kind sentiment sound icky and ignorant. (Same goes for “jewing down”, “Indian giver”, and any similar utterance.)

Perv – A term often used in our field to reference a table grinder or happy ending enthusiast. “That perv just threw a $20 bill on the table and undraped his package.” Just keep in mind: It wasn’t that long ago that many common bedroom practices and expressions of sexual and gender identity were classified as pathological in the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). Many of us would’ve been labeled as “pervs” in years past, even though we’re good-natured people who wouldn’t hurt a fly (unless he asked for it). I prefer to use “creeper”.

Suicide References – Unless you truly feel like you may be suicidal, please stop threatening (thereby trivializing) self harm. Saying “if the Cowboys lose one more game I’m going to kill myself” is insensitive to people who have attempted, succeeded, considered, or lost someone to suicide. Also, I don’t care if you’re a hip hop artist or a comedian: unless you truly feel like you may want to put a gun to your head and pull the trigger, do not bend your fingers into a gun shape and point your index finger at your temple. I know someone who did this with a real gun and now they’re gone, and you’re just an asshat who’s still here. 

Oversimplified Statements on Complex Issues Verbalized Using a Judgmental Tone – “Abortion is terrible”, “suicide is selfish”, “Mega-Mart moving in down the street is great for everybody everywhere”, and “your deceased pet was just a tarantula and mine was a teacup poodle, therefore your grieving couldn’t be comparable to mine” are examples of statements that are usually best left unsaid. Maybe that client tended to his tarantula at a time when he desperately needed someone or something to care for, and maybe he obtained just as much emotional support through his relationship with his spider as you did with your puppy. Maybe that associate’s mom lost her job at the local hardware store because the Mega-Mart cut into the indie shop’s market share. Maybe an abortion saved an employee’s life. You know a lot of things, but you don’t know more. 

I too am guilty of saying things out of ignorance. Twelve years ago I answered the phone at the print shop where I worked. The woman on the other end described a messed up print job she had obtained from another facility in town. I offered a sympathetic “that’s crazy”, and was promptly lectured by this caller (who had spent a significant amount of time being treated for mental health issues) on the offensive nature of the word “crazy”. Twelve years later I’m still not exactly sure how I feel about the word, but I do consider this woman’s standpoint regularly. 

What do you wish people would take a moment to think about before they speak?

(Want to read more about overheard mouth caca? Check out this nifty article.)

World Suicide Prevention Day

As massage therapists humans, we’re in a unique position to be kind to one another. 

In honor of World Suicide Prevention Day 2015, my friend William took the time to film an assortment of Vegas locals who had personal stories to share about suicide. I feel honored to have been included in his project.

Please feel free to share and keep the conversation going. <3

No one is coming to rescue you

Got that? No one is coming to save you.

There is no knight on a white horse. You’re not gonna win the lottery. Praying isn’t going to pay the bills if you don’t get up and go to work, too. The spouse you married for love (but a little bit for security and money, too) could get laid off any minute.  Spiderman will not be swooping in to pull you from the wreckage of your business malaise. Say it with me, “No one is coming to rescue me.”

That’s a pretty frightening revelation, huh?* Just let that linger in the back of your head for a bit.

There are a variety of things we will do when hunger, housing, health are on the line. We will hustle to feed our kids and keep them clothed. We will deliver pizza into the wee hours if it means helping Dad pay for his medication.

However, we become complacent (not just fiscally, but in our emotional satisfaction) when we hit middle ground. We get lazy. We get stupid.

Here’s a common conversation in my world

Me: How many clients do you want to see every week?
You: Oh, 18-20
Me: How many are you seeing right now?
You: Um… well.. some weeks only I have 2 or 3 clients, some weeks I have 10 or 11.
Me: What are you doing to increase that?
You: Weeeellll… I sent out postcards to my old clients. I worked a few health fairs last month….
Me: How’s your website?
You: Oh, well, I really should update that a little… I’m so busy right now, I haven’t gotten to it. We had a tree fall in the yard and I’ve been cleaning it up. My parrot was sick so I’ve been staying home a lot. And I was running the book fair at my son’s school, that was such a project!!
Me: <<Sigh>>

Or in a class recently

Me: Raise your hand if you’re seeing as many clients as you want to.
Only 2 people out of 20 raised their hands.
Me: What’s your biggest obstacle to getting started with online marketing?
“Finding time to learn!”
Me: If you’re only seeing 5 clients a week, and your goal is 15, what the heck are you doing with that extra 10 clients’ worth of time? (Okay- there are some reasonable explanations here, especially if someone is maintaining another job while starting a massage business. But most of the excuses are BS. Total BS.)

See where I’m going with this?

All the marketing blogs, books, online classes, in-person workshops and savvy-tech tools in the world won’t help you if you don’t GET OFF YOUR ASS and do the work. And it’s up to YOU to do it. No one is coming to rescue you. Masses of clients are NEVER going to just show up begging for your services.  (Secret: even if someone did rescue you, eventually you would still end up back in the hole. It’s imperative that you LEARN how to dig out on your own.)


Knowing where to start can be hard, So here are some resources for you.

MassageNerd– Hands on stuff, business stuff, fantastic stock photos. Ryan’s got ’em.

Massage Sloth-Hands on stuff, and Ian’s Facebook page is a treasure trove of brilliant business tips and tricks, too.

Massage Business Blueprint– Yeah, this is my new project, so this is totally narcissistic. Deal. It’s a good resource. 

Will any of these resources be different for you?

Only if you are different. You need to buck up and say, “I want to do more, I want to do better.”

Only if you banish the “But I can’t because blah blah blah…” mentality and replace it with, “I’m going to learn this stuff, and I will be good at it.”

No one is coming to rescue you. The good news is, you can rescue yourself. Your call.

[*I want to make it perfectly clear that we’re talking about business crap, not real legit depression stuff, like I talk about often. If you are suffering from depression or other mental illness please be assured that someone is coming to rescue you. Go here and call or live chat with a professional who can help you right now, or refer you to an appropriate care provider in your area.]

For The Love Of Teaching Massage Therapy

FaceBookI started my teaching career January 2001, and it was the scariest thing I’ve ever done!  I was hired on a Friday, received my books that day, and started teaching on Monday.  Let’s just say I didn’t sleep at all that weekend before I started, because I was reading all the books.  That first week of teaching, I kept asking advice from other instructors, and I got 100’s of different opinions on how to teach.

For the first month I taught right out of the book, will minimal lab in a technique class.  I only did it that way, because the person in charge of the massage program at that time told me it worked for her.  After that first month, I started to feel more comfortable and decided to add my flair.  Well, that was not acceptable to the Director of the program, and she kept having meetings with me to change the way I was teaching.

I was disappointed by most of the massage technique books at the time, that there were hardly any photos and mostly text.  How can you teach a technique class, with no instructions on how to perform massage techniques?  I decided to change that and started developing more techniques, besides the  ones I already knew.  I first drew the techniques (Not the greatest artist), but I knew what I was teaching, and it was easier for the students to remember them.  After a few years of using my drawings in one of my classes, I decided to up my game and took photos of the techniques.  That worked well, but some of my students were still having a hard time remembering them.  My last phase was to shoot videos of the techniques (2005).  Videos worked great, and I finally covered all my bases, so that my students could remember them.

CHOTHES117I quit teaching April 2012 to start working from home – managing social media accounts for many companies (The only reason I quit teaching, was because the director of the school was thinking about cutting the massage program).  It was a lot of fun working from home for the first few months, but then I noticed it was hard turning work off when I work from home.  I typically put in 14 hour days, and that was wearing me down.  My kids even text me…when they’re at home with me.  I’m more of an introvert, but I still need to be around people. 

Just a few months ago, a cosmetology school that was going to be starting a massage therapy program contacted me – and just last week that dream came true…I’m going to start teaching again!  I will continue working for the companies I now work for…plus adding more content to (Because I LOVE what I do), but I’ve had this small void in my heart for the past 3+ years, and it’s time to fill it with teaching!  The ONLY reason I started MassageNerd in 2006, was for my students and I will continue giving them the best education I can. Sleep, who needs sleep???

On a lighter note, my Wife wants me to get out of the house more. :) 

Dropping The Banhammer


Bob* was in his 60s. Southern accent. Tall and not a slight dude (from what I could ascertain upon our face-to-face meeting, as he was fully clothed).

Bob sat down in the reception area of my office, grasping the clipboarded intake form but not yet filling it out. His words came at me in rapid-fire progression.

“Now I get massages every week back home. Can I just use a towel to cover my midsection?” (I use bath towels instead of flat top sheets anyway, but the asking of this question raised a bright orange flag…or maybe it was pink. Fuchsia? Anyway, internal eye roll. Resume transmission.)

“OK, I booked a ninety minute service today, but I need at least thirty minutes of massage on my lower abdomen.”




“I’m sorry Bob. I don’t do abdominal massage here.”

“Why not?! It’s the only way I can relax.”

“It’s my policy, no exceptions. I totally understand if you want to go elsewhere.” I ready myself to rise from my desk and escort him out of my office, but this guy is persistent. (Please forgive the bombardment of non sequiturs I’m about to lob your way, but this was my life last week.)

“I’ve been so stressed at work. I run six companies.” He pulls out his phone, points the screen in my direction and starts scrolling through photos of what I’m to assume are his crew and their work trucks.

“I got divorced in the ‘90s but I’ve been with my girlfriend for years. I’m leaving my business to her when I die.”

“I’m telling you this stuff so you’ll know some things about me.”

“I have two phones.”

“You really won’t do abdominal massage? How long have you been doing this?”

“You really won’t do abdominal massage? I don’t know what kind of massage you think I’m looking for.”

“You really won’t do abdominal massage? But I want to come in tomorrow and the next day too.”

“If you don’t do abdominal massage, what do you do?”

“When I was a little boy my mother would give me abdominal massages. It was the only way I could fall asleep.” (Mommy! An unexpected twist!)

“I’ll make it worth your time.”

“I’ll tip you really well.”

“One hundred dollars.”

“One time I was working with my crew in the woods and we got infested with ticks. I had to shave off all of my pubic hair but I didn’t realize I had to keep shaving it.” (This marked the turning point for me. Parasitic infections of the groin are not my area of expertise, and for good reason.)

“Bob, yeah, I’m not going to be able to help you.” I got up, keeping an eye on him, and made my way to the door. Still facing him I turned the knob and held the door ajar so he could exit. He did, but not before handing me his business card.

“In case you change your mind.”

“Bob, that’s not going to happen.”

Then I noticed that he had cleverly left his phone on my desk, so I exclaimed “Oh! Here’s your phone!” The last thing I needed was more alone time, here, with him.

I came to realize, partway through the convo, that Bob had called me several weeks prior from a different number (two phones!). During that phone call he wanted me to work “overtime” for “a really good tip” of “one hundred dollars” “if [my] husband didn’t mind”. Unfortunately for Bob, I was “booked”.

Adding to the absurdity was this: His persistence was completely unnecessary. In Vegas (as is true in many cities), you have so many happy ending options at your disposal you can’t throw a dead cat without hitting a rub and tug or rash for cash. I mean, Craigslist will bring the lower abdominal massage to you at no extra charge! (The explanation I’m going with is that some folks find my combination of profuse anxiety sweating and groundbreaking bathroom humor utterly irresistible.)

As a rejected Bob walked out the door and down the hall, I was prouder of myself than I had been in a really long time. Like a lot of massage therapists (or humans, even), in the past I’ve worked on people I should’ve fired five minutes into meeting them. Messed-up, battle-scarred people looking for a metaphorical punching bag. People who just make you feel shitty.

And I’m over it.

Call Mommy and have her pick you up.

End transmission.


*Not his real name.

Why Do I Laugh So Much?

I get asked that question a lot at massage conference, and my response is: “Life is too short NOT to laugh.”

Let me give you a little background on myself. Most of my childhood I didn’t laugh much, and suffered from Clinical Depression and OCD. I was give different antidepressants in my teenage years, and that seemed to make my moods feel blah! I even ended up in a Psychiatric Unit a few times in my teenage years.

I didn’t embrace my current personality, until I was going through massage school in 1997. I quit all my antidepressants while I was going through the program, and on my own decision. I was feeling better, and I found something that kept me busy, so I didn’t obsess as much.

I still suffer from depression and OCD, and I’ve learned to keep busy. OCD is who I am, and it’s helped my career over the past decade. I can’t do anything small, and I’m always thinking of ways to keep myself busy, so I delve into work. Now, I just need to find a balance between work and play.

I’m not looking for sympathy, and I just want people to find peace with their hiccups in life.

To quote my favorite T.V. show: “It’s a gift… and a curse.” – Adrian Monk

When at home, I’m  working  in the dark on my computer, playing Techno music, and trying to spend as much time with my family as possible. It’s what helps me keep my sanity.

If you want another perspective, I’m making up for lost time in the laughing category :)